Actresses with Down syndrome honored by disability-advocacy group

Lauren Potter and Robin Trocki, two actresses with Down syndrome who regularly appear on the television series “Glee,” are receiving The Arc’s first Inclusion and Image Award today. “We wanted to commend the actresses and the show in particular for pro…

Lauren Potter and Robin Trocki, two actresses with Down syndrome who regularly appear on the television series "Glee," are receiving The Arc's first Inclusion and Image Award today. "We wanted to commend the actresses and the show in particular for providing positive portrayals of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities," a spokeswoman for The Arc said. Disability Scoop

No arms, no legs…no worries!!!

We all have a disability of some kind; all are lacking in one way or another. Saul has an injury to his leg. What if his personality was deformed? How much worse if his soul was lame? Preachers or teachers look for the good in all of us. (Bless them fo…

We all have a disability of some kind; all are lacking in one way or another. Saul has an injury to his leg. What if his personality was deformed? How much worse if his soul was lame? Preachers or teachers look for the good in all of us. (Bless them for doing so.) I don't see a cripple. I haven't met anyone yet who isn't handicapped in some way. So what's the big deal? Don't hide your deformity. Wear it like a Purple Heart.

Thanks to my cousin, Marian, for sharing this video on Facebook...

Special Olympics cancel events, cite reduced funding, sponsorships

In this Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2010 photo, Tommy Sliva wears medals he has won skiing in the Indiana Special Olympics in Indianapolis. This year Indiana Special Olympics has canceled skiing and showshoeing events because of budget issues. (AP Photo/Tom Stric…

In this Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2010 photo, Tommy Sliva wears medals he has won skiing in the Indiana Special Olympics in Indianapolis. This year Indiana Special Olympics has canceled skiing and showshoeing events because of budget issues. (AP Photo/Tom Strickland) (Tom Strickland, AP / January 5, 2010)

Many state affiliates of the Special Olympics have been cutting programs and eliminating events for athletes with disabilities because of declining sponsorship and reduced funding from the national organization, based in Washington, D.C. Affiliates say they are cutting administrative costs first and taking a strategic approach to cutting athletic programs. However, the president of the Tennessee affiliate said, "If we can't find new avenues for donations, then we will likely be faced with both eliminating some events and some staff by end of the year." Los Angeles Times/The Associated Press

Kim Peek, The Real ‘Rain Man,’ Has Died

You may not recognize his name, but there’s a good chance you remember Rain Man, the 1988 movie starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise.Hoffman’s character, a mega-savant, was based on Kim Peek.As NPR’s Howard Berkes reports from Salt Lake City, where t…

You may not recognize his name, but there's a good chance you remember Rain Man, the 1988 movie starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise.

Hoffman's character, a mega-savant, was based on Kim Peek.

As NPR's Howard Berkes reports from Salt Lake City, where the 58-year-old Peek lived:

He "had severe mental handicaps but reportedly remembered everything he read and heard. Peek had difficulty with simple things like turning on lights or dressing himself, but his memory was legendary. Give him a date and he'd describe its events. Name a place and he'd name the zip code. He reportedly memorized every word in 9,000 books." (NPR.org)

Washington state student with disabilities to swim in Paralympic games

Chris Goodenow / For The Herald (click to enlarge)Kayla Wheeler swims during her individual practice at Harbor Square Athletic Club in Edmonds on Nov. 13.A 13-year-old girl with disabilities from Washington state will compete this week in the 2009 Int…

Chris Goodenow / For The Herald (click to enlarge)
Kayla Wheeler swims during her individual practice at Harbor Square Athletic Club in Edmonds on Nov. 13.

A 13-year-old girl with disabilities from Washington state will compete this week in the 2009 International Paralympic Committee games in Rio de Janeiro. Kayla Wheeler, who was born without legs and with one arm, began hydrotherapy to improve her movement when she was 18 months old. Kayla says teacher Lib Rust was the first to seriously coach her. "You learn to never give up on somebody," Rust said. "You keep at it and you just keep at it and know that there are no boundaries if somebody wants to keep going." The Herald (Everett, Wash.)

TEACHER SOL 2009-11-04 23:07:00

Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius, who wears carbon-fibre blades, lost his bid to compete against able-bodied athletes at the Beijing Olympics. Photograph: Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty ImagesResearchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have f…


Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius, who wears carbon-fibre blades, lost his bid to compete against able-bodied athletes at the Beijing Olympics. Photograph: Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that prosthetics worn by sprinters who have disabilities do not give the athletes an unfair advantage over runners without them, as had been claimed by authorities before the most recent Olympics. Last year, South African Paralympic runner Oscar Pistorius had been unsuccessful in convincing Olympic officials to let him compete using carbon-fiber prosthetic blades. The Guardian (London)


Should Helen Keller be played by an actress with disabilities?

This New York Times blog post looks at the controversy generated over a decision to award the lead role in an upcoming Broadway production about Helen Keller to Abigail Breslin, a well-known actress who does not share Keller’s vision and hearing disabi…

This New York Times blog post looks at the controversy generated over a decision to award the lead role in an upcoming Broadway production about Helen Keller to Abigail Breslin, a well-known actress who does not share Keller's vision and hearing disabilities. The producer of the show said he wanted a star for the show to drive up ticket sales and may consider an understudy with disabilities. The New York Times/Arts Beat blog

British educator who has dyslexia wins national teaching award

Mr Vickerman was warned that he had no future teaching children in schoolsEdward Vickerman, an educator who is dyslexic, recently received a national teaching award in the U.K. Vickerman, who says he uses technology to help him communicate with his st…

Mr Vickerman was warned that he had no future teaching children in schools

Edward Vickerman, an educator who is dyslexic, recently received a national teaching award in the U.K. Vickerman, who says he uses technology to help him communicate with his students, said, "I was told I could never be a teacher, so this award is for anyone like me who is dyslexic and wants to teach." The Independent (London)

Indiana woman with Down syndrome becomes advocacy leader

Jessica Green, who has Down syndrome, was recently named a member of the board of directors of the National Down Syndrome Congress. Green volunteers for Down Syndrome Indiana, writing a blog and putting together a Web-based newsletter for the organizat…

Jessica Green, who has Down syndrome, was recently named a member of the board of directors of the National Down Syndrome Congress. Green volunteers for Down Syndrome Indiana, writing a blog and putting together a Web-based newsletter for the organization. Green, of Indianapolis, encourages people with Down syndrome to "stand up for themselves," saying that "people with special challenges have much to share and much to give." The Indianapolis Star

Girl with Down syndrome thriving on swim team

Courtney takes off for some laps. Courtney Pyburn, a 12-year-old North Carolina girl with Down syndrome, trains and competes on her community swim team with children without disabilities and is flourishing. “Other sports, there’s a roster,” says her co…


Courtney takes off for some laps.


Courtney Pyburn, a 12-year-old North Carolina girl with Down syndrome, trains and competes on her community swim team with children without disabilities and is flourishing. "Other sports, there's a roster," says her coach. "... And swimming, it's much more individual in that you're competing against yourself as well as the other teams." The News & Record (Greensboro, N.C.)